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The Cost Of Addiction: A Look At Opioid Treatment Expenses

The Cost Of Addiction: A Look At Opioid Treatment Expenses

Addiction is a devastating disease, affecting far more than just those at its epicenter. From personal emotional and physical trauma to that inflicted on close friends and family members, finding the courage to get the help and support you need to start on the road to recovery is incredibly difficult.

 

Unfortunately, that path is not free. If you’re thinking about entering an opioid recovery center or are curious about what the cost of suboxone treatment — a common path among those addicted to opioids –, here is a brief breakdown of what you may encounter.

 

Medication Matters

If getting yourself on a treatment plan or into a rehabilitation center is extremely hard, staying there and committing to the program will feel nigh impossible. The agonies of withdrawal during the detox process causes a tragic 95% of people to suffer relapses; however, there are three main drugs that can be administered to patients to make the experience more bearable — and more safe, depending on the severity of their addiction. They are and their costs are as follows.

  • Methadone: Methadone eliminates withdrawal symptoms and relieves drug cravings by acting on opioid receptors in the brain, essentially giving them what they want without any of the associated euphoric feelings. Treatment, which embodies both the medication and integrated psychosocial and medical support services and assumes daily visits usually works out to about $126 per week or $6,552 per year.
  • Buprenorphine (Suboxone): This drug binds to those same opioid receptors but activates them less strongly than full agonists do. It also can reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms in a person with an opioid use disorder without producing euphoria. With medication and twice-weekly visits, the cost of suboxone treatment is $115 per week or $5,980 per year.
  • Naltrexone: Naltrexone blocks the activation of opioid receptors. This means that if patients do relapse, they won’t feel the high — again, that euphoria — of their opioid, which encourages them to consider the regret and get back on track. Including drug, drug administration, and related services, this opioid antagonist can cost $1,176 per month or $14,112 per year.

 

A Strong Support System

While the cost of suboxone treatment, and indeed any of the others, may already seem extreme, there is still the rehab center to consider. Those who realize they have a problem may be able to simply take their medications and attend weekly or biweekly doctor’s appointments and support meetings, but many will need full-time, round-the-clock structure. Rehab centers vary wildly in cost, but are always worth the price if the sufferer is able to overcome their struggle and learn healthy coping mechanisms.

 

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